Medical Progress Today
mpt home | sign up

Volume 3, Number 24
July 7, 2006


PRINTER FRIENDLY

In the Spotlight

The Bureaucratization of Safety and Effectiveness

Benjamin Zycher, Ph.D., Medical Progress Today, 7-7-06

On June 30 the self-applause of The Beltway will be deafening, and not merely because it falls on a day hallowed above all others by government employees, to wit, a Friday beginning a long holiday weekend. No, that date marks the 100th anniversary of the FDA, an agency now synonymous with the bureaucratized analysis of the safety and effectiveness of pharmaceuticals.
Continue reading . . .

News

Global Vaccine Initiative Hits Snag
Wall Street Journal, 7-7-06

Editor's Notes:

Political wrangling threatens to hold back a plan by G–8 governments to stimulate new vaccine production by pharmaceutical companies. This article provides a good look into the economic issues and political actors involved in the effort to create "advance purchase commitments" for vaccines where market incentives may be weak. These issues are expected to come to a head during the upcoming G–8 conference, where three new drug–finance plans are expected to be debated.
Continue reading . . .

New AIDS Pill to Treat People in Poor Countries
The New York Times, 7-6-06

Editor's Notes:

The FDA has approved a new generic triple combination AIDS drug to be used as part of President Bush's initiative against AIDS in the Third World.
Continue reading . . .

Panel Unanimously Recommends Cervical Cancer Vaccine for Girls 11 and Up
The New York Times, 6-30-06

Editor's Notes:

The latest news of the federal recommendation of widespread distribution of Merck's new vaccine for cervical cancer, Gardasil, is promising for women around the world. As part of the recommended list of vaccines, Merck's new drug Gardasil will be placed in the federal Vaccine Injury Compensation program, a spot that will limit Merck's liability exposure and encourage further drug distribution and research.
Continue reading . . .

A 'Good Deed' For AIDS Drug Hits Obstacles
Wall Street Journal, 0-0-00

Editor's Notes:

Gilead Sciences has discovered that its attempt to provide a cheaper version of its AIDS drug, Viread, in poor countries has met with a maze of bureaucracy and regulations that has slowed its distribution and brought the company yet more criticism from AIDS activists.
Continue reading . . .

Commentary

Bismark's Health Plan
Wall Street Journal, 7-7-06

In an analysis of German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s efforts to reform the German economy, the Journal offers a concise exposition of why state run health care systems are not the best option for national consumers or government budgets.
Continue reading . . .

Grading Surgeons May Be A Healthy Practice
David Wessel, Wall Street Journal, 7-6-06

In this piece, David Wessel argues that "report cards" for surgeons can raise the quality of care for patients and that giving information to consumers is an important part of a free market health care system. While he admits that publicly distributed individual doctor "report cards" encourage doctors who know they are being graded to avoid tough cases or simply move to states without such systems, he advocates the use of these report cards to reform the health care system. But it is important to note that anonymous or privately reviewed "report cards" can also be easily accessible for consumers and health care officials, without the damaging effects that Wessel has pointed out.
Continue reading . . .

How the West's Health Fads Kill the Poor
Mark Weston, Campaign for Fighting Diseases, 7-5-06

Mark Weston offers a look into how Western paranoia over drug side effects has affected the developing world and argues that while the damages from overreaction to drug side effects may be minimal in developed countries they are significant in poorer nations.
Continue reading . . .

Restraining Doctors Isn't the Answer
Stephen Hoffman, The Boston Globe, 6-29-06

Stephen Hoffman, a practicing physician, writes on the difficulties faced by doctors when dealing with insurance companies, medical malpractice, and prescription drug prices. Hoffmann argues that doctors need more discretion to determine the right treatment for their patients, without needless oversight from insurers and the omnipresent fear of lawsuits. His suggestions for less restraint might be applied across the board in the health care industry, for the benefit of doctors and patients alike.
Continue reading . . .


Medical Progress Today is published by the Center for Medical Progress at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research.

For more information about Medical Progress Today, please contact the managing editor, Paul Howard, at phoward@manhattan-institute.org, or via telephone at 212.599.7000.

Press inquiries regarding Medical Progress Today can be directed to the Communications Department, at communications@manhattan-institute.org, or via telephone at 212.599.7000.

If you would like to unsubscribe, please reply to us and type "Unsubscribe" in the subject line.

In this week's issue:

SPOTLIGHT

The Bureaucratization of Safety and Effectiveness

NEWS

Global Vaccine Initiative Hits Snag
New AIDS Pill to Treat People in Poor Countries
Panel Unanimously Recommends Cervical Cancer Vaccine for Girls 11 and Up
A 'Good Deed' For AIDS Drug Hits Obstacles

COMMENTARY

Bismark's Health Plan
Grading Surgeons May Be A Healthy Practice
How the West's Health Fads Kill the Poor
Restraining Doctors Isn't the Answer
Center for Medical Progress 
Copyright Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
52 Vanderbilt Avenue
New York, NY 10017
(212) 599-7000
mpt@manhattan-institute.org