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Volume 3, Number 16
May 5, 2006


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In the Spotlight

Shadegg Bill Promotes Healthy Competition
Let the states compete in a national health insurance market.

Sally C. Pipes, Medical Progress Today, 5-5-06

Republican Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney is the current toast of the establishment press and pundits, having taken on health care, added more government, and required that people purchase insurance. Free market advocates, however, should look west for health care solutions proposed by Arizona Rep. John Shadegg (R). His bill, H.R. 2355, The Choice Act, has now reported favorably out of the Energy and Commerce Committee and will go to the Floor for a vote in June.
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Commentary

Prodigal State
Newt Gingrich, Wall Street Journal, 5-4-06

As medical malpractice reforms are debated in the U.S. Senate, Gingrich looks to Texas for a model of how targeted reforms can help improve health care access and affordability.
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Bad Bugs, Few Drugs
Henry I. Miller, Washington Times, 5-3-06

Even as physicians scramble to keep ahead of the latest drug-resistant pathogens, new antibiotics are in short supply, and the pipeline for future products is alarmingly thin. Miller explains why R&D for new antibiotics has grown scarce, and suggests how policymakers can encourage companies to expand their efforts in this vital area.
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Risky Business
Carl J. Schramm, Wall Street Journal Europe, 5-3-06

This op–ed, for the WSJ's European edition, isn't about health care, strictly speaking. But Shramm offers a powerful explanation of why America's embrace of entrepreneurial risk taking has spurred the creation of millions of new jobs during the last 20 years, while Europe's own private sector has remained stagnant. The lesson for American policymakers thinking about health care reform is that we must extend that dynamism and entrepreneurial spirit to the health care sector through deregulation and reforms that put consumers, not bureaucrats, in charge of health care spending.
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Crisis du Jour or the Real Thing?
Joe Antos, American Enterprise Institute, 5-3-06

Antos delves into the niceties of the Medicare trustees report to show how the program is a crisis in slow motion. Antos likens the forces driving Medicare's relentless cost expansion to geologic stress preceding an earthquake—with similar results for the economy, unless politicians get serious about real Medicare reforms.
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Patient Power: The FDA Doesn’t Have to Decide Everything
John Calfee, The Weekly Standard, 5-1-06

Calfee argues that the FDA's approach to risk management for a promising MS treatment should focus on giving patients the information they need to make informed choices, not make those choices for them.
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Competition is the Way
John Shadegg, Jim DeMint, Washington Times, 5-1-06

U.S. Representative John Shadegg (R, AZ) and Senator Jim DeMint (R, SC) explain why Americans should be able to choose health insurance from a national market. Under the current system, individuals who lack employer provided health insurance can only purchase the health insurance package that state regulators (and special interest groups) want them to buy.
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Medical Liability Repair
Stuart Weinstein, Washington Times, 4-30-06

Early next week, the U.S. Senate is scheduled to vote on medical malpractice reform legislation, and Weinstein explains here why the vote should be positive.
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A Serious Senate Agenda for "Health Week"
Nina Owcharenko, Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Heritage Foundation, 4-30-06

Moffit and Owcharenko lay out a series of principles and policies that readers can use to gauge the seriousness of health care reforms in Congress. Moffit and Owcharenko argue that there are
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Research

Intensive Medical Care and Cardiovascular Disease Disability Reductions
David M. Cutler, Mary Beth Landrum, Kate A. Stewart, NBER, 5-1-06

Cutler and his colleagues offer evidence here for how improvements in the treatment of cardiovascular disease in recent decades have helped America's seniors remain healthier well into their golden years.
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In this week's issue:

SPOTLIGHT

Shadegg Bill Promotes Healthy Competition

COMMENTARY

Prodigal State
Bad Bugs, Few Drugs
Risky Business
Crisis du Jour or the Real Thing?
Patient Power: The FDA Doesn’t Have to Decide Everything
Competition is the Way
Medical Liability Repair
A Serious Senate Agenda for "Health Week"

RESEARCH

Intensive Medical Care and Cardiovascular Disease Disability Reductions
Center for Medical Progress 
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